Contact

GW Chemistry Department
Science & Engineering Hall, Suite 4000
800 22nd Street, NW
Washington, DC 20052

Email: gwchem@gwu.edu
Phone: (202) 994-6121
Fax: (202) 994-5873


Visiting the Chemistry Department

By Car
If you come by car, please use the visitor parking garage below the Science and Engineering Hall. The entrance is on H Street between 22nd and 23rd Streets. You can access the building lobby from the garage. 

(map it!)

By Metro
You can come to GW by Metro (get off at the Foggy Bottom station on the Orange, Blue, or Silver line). The SEH (Chemistry building) is across Eye Street from the Metro. There are entrances on 22nd Street and 23rd Street between H and Eye Streets. Come to the 4th floor, and turn left out of the elevator to reach the Chemistry Office.


Visiting us at the Virginia Campus

We have lab space in Exploration Hall, located at 20101 Academic Way in Ashburn, VA 20147.

By Car (from the East)

Follow I-66 West, and take exit 67 toward Dulles Airport (right lane exit, just past the Sycamore Street/Falls Church Exit).  Follow signs for Route 267, To All Local Exits Keep right, following signs to 267 Toll West. (Do NOT veer left onto the No Toll Dulles Access Road – it is an express road to the airport).  Continue approximately 11 miles to Exit 9B, Route 28 North—Sully Road.  Exit toll booth onto Route 28, Sully Road.  Drive approximately 5 miles, following signs to Route 7 West to Leesburg. There is a left lane entrance lane to Route 7.  Merge with Route 7 traffic.  Exit Route 7 on right ramp for Loudoun County Parkway (607). Stay right on the ramp for 607 North and continue straight/slight right. Turn right onto George Washington Boulevard (will see signs for Springhill Suites and Lakeview).  Turn left onto Academic Way, and left into the parking lot. Exploration Hall is a four-story brick building set against the hillside.

By Car (from the West)

Take Route 7 East toward Tysons Corner.  After passing Ashburn Village on your right look for a sign for Loudoun County Parkway exit. ***Please note this is a new traffic pattern. Presidential Drive no longer exists.  Exit Route 7 on right ramp and stay in the left lane to travel North. Turn left at the top of the overpass, continue straight/slight left across the intersection at the light, and turn right onto George Washington Boulevard (when see signs for Springhill Suites and Lakeview).  Exploration Hall will be the first building on your left. Turn left onto Academic Way, and left into the parking lot. Exploration Hall is a four-story brick building set against the hillside.

By VSTC Express (Intercampus Shuttle) or Wiehle Express (Metro Shuttle)

The shuttle services are free for GWorld card holders.

Location of Shuttle Stops

VSTC Express schedule

Foggy Bottom (FB) Stop:
G Street between 22nd and 23rd Streets, NW, Washington, D.C. (Funger Hall)

Wiehle Express (runs between the Wiehle-Reston East metro station and the VSTC):
Wiehle-Reston East Metro: Stop at South Bus Bay N and South Bus Bay P

GW Virginia Science and Technology Campus Shuttle Stops
Main entrances to
Exploration Hall, 20101 Academic Way, Ashburn, VA 20147 (VSTC Express and Wiehle Express)
Innovation Hall, 45085 University Drive, Ashburn, VA 20147 (VSTC Express and Wiehle Express)
Enterprise Hall, 44983 Knoll Square, Ashburn, VA 20147 (VSTC Express and Wiehle Express)

Questions About the VSTC Express Shuttle?
Please contact the International Limousine Service (ILS) Dispatch at 202-388-6800 x236 if any schedule issues/problems arise

Please contact the Loudoun County Transit at (571) 258-3464 if any schedule issues/problems arise with the Wiehle Express Service.

*** Please note there is no service on Sundays or official university holidays.

 

Using Lasers to Develop Sensors

Using Lasers to Develop Sensors

Professor of Chemistry J. Houston Miller works with his team on spectroscopy research, using beams of light to determine the presence of substances within flames and in other samples. Miller has refined a technique in which a laser beam bouncing between mirrors can provide sensitive and precise measurements of the presence of molecules within a sample. The method can be used to develop sensors, and a Pennsylvania company has employed Miller’s system in a commercial atmospheric device.